Can you freeze Vietnamese mint?

You could also freeze the leaves for a rainy day or dry them out. For the former, remove the leaves from the stem and lay on baking trays in the freezer. Once frozen, pack loosely into freezer bags making sure you don’t crush them too much but do expel as much air as you can.

Can mint leaves be frozen for future use?

Mint (Mentha spp.) can be saved for later use by drying or freezing, though it is best to use the dried leaves within a year and the frozen leaves within 6 months for the best flavor. Begin by rinsing and gently patting your herbs dry. … To freeze mint leaves, place them in a resealable plastic freezer bag.

Do you need to blanch mint before freezing?

Mint, chives, tarragon, fennel, parsley, basil and dill all retain their flavor better when frozen than when dried. Except for basil and dill, these herbs should be blanched before freezing to preserve their fresh color and taste.

How do you preserve Vietnamese mint?

Place the Vietnamese mint, stems down, in a small container of water and place a plastic bag over the leaves. It can be refrigerated for up to a week. Be sure to change the water every couple of days. To dry hang small bunches upside down in a cool dark place for about two weeks then store in an airtight container.

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How do you keep mint from going bad?

If you want to store fresh mint and other herbs in the fridge, store them in a glass jar and treat them like a bouquet of flowers. Or, store only the mint leaves between sheets of damp paper towel, and they will keep for two to three weeks.

What is Vietnamese coriander good for?

Vietnamese coriander is an herb. … People use Vietnamese coriander for diabetes, stomach pain, constipation, dandruff, gas (flatulence), and to reduce sexual desire, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses. In food, Vietnamese coriander is used to flavor soups, stews, and salads.

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